Center for Latin American, Caribbean, and Latino Studies

Document Type

Report

Publication Date

12-2008

Abstract

Introduction: This report analyzes demographic and socioeconomic characteristics among the five largest Latino nationality groups during 1990-2006 in the NYC Community District 9 of the borough of the Bronx, which comprises the neighborhoods of Parkchester, Unionport, Soundview, Castle Hill, and Clason Point.

Methods: Data on Latinos and other racial/ethnic groups were obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau American Community Survey, reorganized for public use by the Minnesota Population Center, University of Minnesota, IPUMSusa. Cases in the dataset were weighted and analyzed to produce population estimates.

Results: Puerto Ricans are the largest Latino subgroup in the Bronx Community District 9, accounting for over 32% of the total population and 75% of the Latino population in the district. Latinos in the Bronx Community District 9, as a group, tend to be younger than non-Hispanic Whites and non-Hispanic Blacks. Among the major racial/ethnic groups, Latinos have the second lowest homeownership rate in the district after non-Hispanic Blacks. The annual median incomes of the majority of the residents in the Bronx Community District 9 have increased since 1990. Asians and Non-Hispanic Whites had the largest median incomes even though they represent the smallest segments of the total population in the district. Among Latinos, Ecuadorians and Guatemalans also had the largest median incomes even though they represented the smallest segments of the Latino population in Community District 9. Educational attainment levels differed significantly among the major racial/ethnic groups, with Asians achieving significantly higher educational attainment levels over Latinos, which had the lowest percentage of individuals with a Bachelor’s or higher degree. Among Latinos, Dominicans and Puerto Ricans had the highest percentage of people 25 years and older who had a B.A. or higher degree.

Discussion: Bronx-based stakeholders and advocacy groups may find this report valuable when attempting to identify key trends and obstacles facing Latinos in these communities and better allocate time and resources.

Comments

For additional information about this collection see http://clacls.gc.cuny.edu/

 
 

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