Date of Degree

6-2017

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Program

Liberal Studies

Advisor(s)

Roger Hart

Subject Categories

Accessibility | Early Childhood Education | Elementary Education

Keywords

kindergarten readiness, kindergarten entry, academic redshirting

Abstract

This paper examines the contemporary debate over redshirting within the context of a historical analysis of how schools in the United States have addressed children’s transition into kindergarten. It also considers how preparation for the transition to school is cause for concern that has varied greatly depending on the socio-economic conditions of children’s families. Redshirting is the term currently being used to define a child’s delayed entry into kindergarten, usually with the intention of creating an additional year for that child to develop socially and to strive academically. Central to understanding this phenomenon and how to address it is the issue of children’s kindergarten readiness. The high-pressured nature of modern schooling has increased learning demands of children in the lower grades and even kindergarten, creating confusion and resulting in fear for most parents. A historical analysis of the changing theories, policies, and practices of preparing children for the transition into kindergarten in the United States is provided as a way of shedding light on the present controversy of redshirting children prior to them making their kindergarten debut.

 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.