Publications and Research

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2015

Abstract

Biographers of Catharine Macaulay (1731–91), much like her contemporaries, often agreed that the woman’s reputation was shaped by the peculiar company she kept: prominent, intellectual, political, radical, revolutionary, and occasion- ally “foolish.”3 This essay examines why it matters what company a writer keeps, especially when that writer is a woman and her reputation is tied to the status of her letters and her correspondents.

Comments

This article was originally published in The Eighteenth Century, available at DOI 10.1353/ecy.2015.0016

 
 

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