Date of Degree

2-2022

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Program

Nursing

Advisor

Juan Battle

Committee Members

Barbara DiCicco-Bloom

Jessie Daniels

Subject Categories

Nursing Administration | Other Nursing

Keywords

emergency nurse, nurse turnover, nurse retention, nurse attrition, nurse intention to leave

Abstract

The United States is facing an imminent nurse staffing crisis. An aging workforce, an increasing elder population, and new staffing legislation have added to existing difficulties in retaining nurses. Retaining nurses is a priority in emergency departments, one of the few specialty departments that exceed the national average turnover rate, with an average of 95% of the nursing staff leaving their positions every five years. This dissertation used dual-factor theory, dimensions of nursing surveillance, and intersectionality as theoretical frameworks; employed secondary analysis of the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (2018) dataset; and utilized hierarchical regression Modeling to examine the relative impact of workplace factors, educational factors, and key demographic variables on nurses' intention to leave their position for three groups, including emergency nurses, from a national sample. Given the findings of this dissertation, recommendations are made that can facilitate the development of targeted solutions to improve nursing retention.

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