Publications and Research

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-2016

Abstract

Citing webpages has been a common practice in scholarly publications for nearly two decades as the Web evolved into a major information source. But over the years, more and more bibliographies have suffered from “reference rot”: cited URLs are broken links or point to a page that no longer contains the content the author originally cited. In this column, I look at several studies showing how reference rot has affected different academic disciplines. I also examine citation styles’ approach to citing web sources. I then turn to emerging web citation practices: Perma, a “freemium” web archiving service specifically for citation; and the Internet Archive, the largest web archive.

Comments

This is the submitted version of an article originally published in Behavioral and Social Sciences Librarian.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01639269.2016.1241122

 
 

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